Thursday, May 3, 2012

Tips on bathing your dog

1. Start bathing your dog regularly at a young age to get him used to the process. But remember, puppies should be at least four weeks old before they receive their first bath.

2. Before starting an indoor bath, make sure the house is warm. Turn up the thermostat a few degrees if necessary. Do your prep work and have everything ready ahead of time; you don't want to be scrambling for shampoo or a towel while you're trying to wash the dog.

3. Start by combing and brushing out all mats. Otherwise, the water will turn the mats into solid masses, which will require clippers to remove. If your dog's hair is matted with paint, tar or some other sticky material, trim with clippers or soak the area with vegetable or mineral oil for 24 hours. (Consult a professional groomer for especially difficult tangles.)

4. Prep your dog. Put a drop of mineral oil in the eyes to protect them from suds. Some people use cotton balls in the ears. If you use cotton balls, make sure they're the right size for your dog's ears; if they're too small, they may slip down the ear canal. Be very gentle with your dog's delicate ears and don't push the cotton down further than can be easily retrieved.

5. Bathe your dog as quickly as possible to make the process less annoying for both of you. Be thorough and do a good cleaning, but whether you're using an indoor tub or shower or washing him in the yard, do it as quickly as possible. Make sure to dry your dog immediately. Use a good pet chamois, lots of big soft towels, or a hair dryer set to a low setting.
(If you don't dry him, he will "shake off" all the water on you, your house or anything nearby!)

Alice England

makingstuffwithlove.etsy.com

3 comments:

Giupetto and Gianna Tails said...

Great post.
Dogs seem to hate the face wet the most, so I usually start at the back end, getting them used to the water and then move up. I clean thier body first without wetting the head until the very end.

Art and Sew Forth said...

Good advice. And cute pics too!

Michael Johhnsen said...

Like human fingernails, a dog's nails tend to be softer after bathing, making clipping much easier. However, if your dog tends to be more rambunctious or panicky with handling, you may already have completed this step for your own safety.

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